Polka Dot Death Box 1986
Unique World Edition Of Originals: 8 (1 available)
Size Of Piece: 20 x 15 inches
Size Of Frame: 31 x 27 inches
Original Type: Vintage Cibachrome Deluxe 1986
Hand printed by The Artist
Price
£9,000
SIGNED BY THE ARTIST
IN STOCK. ARCHIVAL MOUNT. LUXURY GOLD METAL FRAME.

Elliott created this profound piece just days before he got engaged. He proposed to Elizabeth Caron on top of the Eifel Tower on the 4th of April. Elliott knew the view from the tower stretched for 44 miles! The artist liked the four fours.
Asked in an interview if he was superstitious he quipped :

"I'm much too intelligent to be one of those people who are too intelligent to be superstitious!"

Five years later when Elliott took up psychology and philosophy he abandoned superstition.


Polka Dot Death Box is a graphically arresting image which juxtaposes icons of childhood, marriage and death. Interestingly, this image was created just before Elliott got engaged to Elizabeth Caron. Was he already subconsciously predicting the relationships demise? Elliott divorced her little more than a couple of years later after an eleven year relationship. Elliott acedes no awareness of that and states the image was inspired by wedding photos with confetti flying through the air. Even so, the notion of marriage making one feel "boxed in" is common enough and the image almost appears to say "boxed in until death". On the other hand the whole thing looks like a bit of a party - very celebratory in its feel. The gift box, the polka dot background and the use of "Christmas colours" all suggest something rather wonderful. The image has a sort of busy beauty about it.
Perhaps then it rather laconically sums up the sacrifices we often make for greater gains, especially in relationships.
The cross is fascinating as it is half there and half not there and although this appears random, it belies the fact that Elliott created the image using tweezers to move the confetti around by fractional degrees. The lineage of the image can be traced back to many earlier works but especially "The Cracked Plastic Hat" which uses a similarly dfazzling subject and background and just as that image suggested "The Mad Party Of Life" so indeed, with greater substance, does this one. Deep stuff.